Basics of Rowing

Familiarize yourself with boatie terminology! This is crucial to your successful integration into a crew! It is also crucial for your learning!

This is how rowing works:

The Rowing Stroke

The rowing stroke can be divided into two parts: The drive and the recovery.

You will learn a coordinated movement pattern built upon the following positions and phases:

The Recovery (Phase 1)

  • Extend your arms until they straighten.
  • Lean your upper body forward to the one o’clock position.
  • Once your hands and the oar handle have cleared your knees, allow your knees to bend and gradually slide the seat forward on the monorail.

The Catch (Position 1)

  • Arms are straight; head is neutral; shoulders are level and not hunched.
  • Upper body is at the one o’clock position—shoulders in front of hips.
  • Shins are vertical and not compressed beyond the perpendicular.
  • Balls of the feet are in full contact with the footplate.

The Drive (Phase 2)

  • With straight arms and while maintaining the position of the upper body at one o’clock, exert pressure on the foot plate and begin pushing with your legs.
  • As your legs approach straight, lean the upper body back to the eleven o’clock position and draw the hands back to the lower ribs in a straight line.

The Finish (Position 2)

  • Legs are extended and handle is held lightly at your lower ribs.
  • Upper body is at the eleven o’clock position—slightly reclined with good support from your core muscles.
  • Head is in a neutral position.
  • Neck and shoulders are relaxed, and arms are drawn past the body with flat wrists.

Watch the following video to familiarize yourself with what it’s supposed to look like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_zmJYQ5URw

For more information, visit the Concept2 website: http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/training/technique-videos

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